Chinese Lore- A Selection of Mythical Fauna (3)

Tiao Fish Physical Description: A fish that looks like a four-headed chicken with red feathers, six feet and three tails. Its call sounds like that of the magpie. Special Properties: Consuming its meat is a cure for anxiety. Heng Gong Fish Physical Description: A 1.5-1.6m long fish that looks like a carp that is redContinue reading “Chinese Lore- A Selection of Mythical Fauna (3)”

Chinese Lore- A Selection of Mythical Fauna (2)

Ri Ji Physical Description: A normal cow Special Properties: Its meat (up to 2-3 Chinese pounds in weight) will grow back fully the day after being cut off with a knife. Lore: A species supposedly local to the area now known as the province of Gan Su Dan Prawn Physical Description: A giant prawn asContinue reading “Chinese Lore- A Selection of Mythical Fauna (2)”

Remarkable Women in Ancient China (8)- Xu Zhao Pei

Who is she: The first divorced wife of a royalty (in death) Was associated with the idiom “Mistress Xu was half-old” referring to a woman past her prime but still charming Notable Life Events: Born to a line of prominent officials (her grandfather was the Prime Minister and her father was also a high rankingContinue reading “Remarkable Women in Ancient China (8)- Xu Zhao Pei”

Chinese Lore- A Selection of Mythical Fauna (1)

South Sea Butterfly (aka Hundred Illusions Butterfly) Physical Description: A huge butterfly that still weighs about 80g after its massive wingspans are cut off Lore: It is said that sailors of South Sea had once encountered something as massive as a sail that fluttered by and hit the sails on their ship. They hit thisContinue reading “Chinese Lore- A Selection of Mythical Fauna (1)”

Chinese Lore- A selection of Mythical Flora (3)

Li Tree Physical Description: A tree with square leaves and yellow flowers that sprouts tiny floss on their petals. Special Properties: The fruits it bears are fist-sized. Consuming them will greatly improve one’s memory, might even make someone attain photographic memory. Zhi Chu Physical Description: A plant that looks like okra except that it hasContinue reading “Chinese Lore- A selection of Mythical Flora (3)”

Remarkable Women in Ancient China (7)- Fu Shan Xiang

Who is she: The first and only female Zhuang yuan (the one with the highest score who sat the examination for scholars to become government officials) in ancient China Notable Life Events: Born in 1833 in Nanjing to a scholarly family, which quickly fell into poverty after both of her parents died when she wasContinue reading “Remarkable Women in Ancient China (7)- Fu Shan Xiang”

Ancient Chinese naming practice

Today I want to discuss ancient Chinese naming practice since I have a personal fascination with names both in terms of their meaning and how they sound to the ears. This tends to apply to a lesser degree to English than my native language of Chinese but I still tend to grope for the rightContinue reading “Ancient Chinese naming practice”

Remarkable Women in Ancient China (6)- Liu Ru Shi

Who is she: One of the Eight Beauties of Qin Huai, essentially eight prominent prostitutes of the late Ming era (Qin Huai is the name of a river in Nanjing, it was a red light district back then with brothels operating on boats) famed for poetry, painting and beauty  A highly patriotic woman  Notable LifeContinue reading “Remarkable Women in Ancient China (6)- Liu Ru Shi”

Tales of Inspiration (3)

Today I’m going to talk about the inspiration underlying my current WIP.  I’ve alluded to this before: for many years, I was an active member at a website where you can submit what I call articles in prose on world meta: all the different aspects that make up a world. It was there that IContinue reading “Tales of Inspiration (3)”

Chinese Superstition- Physical Oddities and Polycoria

Following on the last post about Chinese number superstition, I decided to do another on a related topic. So ancient Chinese had various fortune telling methods, one of which was looking at people’s facial features. For example, long ears or a long gap between the nose and the upper lip were considered a sign ofContinue reading “Chinese Superstition- Physical Oddities and Polycoria”